Welcome to Alluring Alycia Debnam-Carey, your source for everything Alycia on the web! She is most recognized for her roles as Alicia Clark on the AMC hit television show "Fear the Walking Dead" & as Lexa on The CW’s "The 100". Feel free to browse the site and take advantage of our extensive gallery featuring over 18,500 photos, video archive with over 190 videos, and more!
Press/Videos: Alicia Gets an Invitation to Alexandria in This Fear the Walking Dead Sneak Peek

Press/Videos: Alicia Gets an Invitation to Alexandria in This Fear the Walking Dead Sneak Peek

Season 4B of Fear the Walking Dead will pick up some time after Madison’s (Kim Dickens) death. Our survivors have found a new place to live where they’re all close enough to each other to help if necessary but not so close that they’re a community. There’s still some bad blood between June (Jenna Elfman) and Charlie (Alexa Nisenson) and Madison’s people after two of the three Clarks died, you know? And even within the smaller groups not everyone is together. Luciana (Danay Garcia) and Strand (Colman Domingo) are living in a mansion where they’re raiding the wine cellar every day, and they don’t see much of Alicia (Alycia Debnam-Carey), who’s living in the greenhouse and growing isolated from humanity.

Meanwhile, Morgan (Lennie James) has decided to go back to Alexandria. He’s enlisted Al (Maggie Grace) to drive him, and he’s trying to convince the others to come with him. In this clip, he makes his pitch to Alicia, who he finds killing walkers with her sharpened gun barrel by herself at a fence at the edge of the property. Someone has been tacking notes begging for help to the walkers’ bodies, and Alicia is trying to figure out where the notes are coming from. Morgan, who has seen this kind of behavior before in himself, is skeptical that she’ll be able to help.

Source: TV Guide

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Press: ‘Fear The Walking Dead’ Star Alycia Debnam-Carey Says Alicia Doesn’t Need Another Love Interest

Press: ‘Fear The Walking Dead’ Star Alycia Debnam-Carey Says Alicia Doesn’t Need Another Love Interest

A new love interest is “unlikely” for Alicia Clark as she continues to navigate the fallout from the devastating losses of brother Nick and mother Madison, says actress Alycia Debnam-Carey.

Asked during a Q&A session with Facebook Live Argentina if Alicia will find real love in the zombie apocalypse, Debnam-Carey answered, “She’s had a lot of love, that’s the thing.”

There was boyfriend Matt, who suffered a walker bite early on in the initial stages of the outbreak, ultimately succumbing to the resulting fever and perishing off-screen. During the group’s time at sea in season 2, there was a flirtation with radio pen pal and “catfish” Jack Kipling, and Alicia entered into a romantic relationship in season 3 with Jake Otto during the Clark’s stay at the Broke Jaw Ranch.

Following Jake’s death and the group’s subsequent relocation to Texas, Alicia remained unattached and is likely to stay that way for the foreseeable future: Alicia, now the last-surviving member of the Clark clan, will have to weather her own storm as she continues to survive in the apocalypse without her family.

“I mean, I’m happy that Alicia doesn’t have to have a relationship at this point. I think she’s lost so much that it’s probably unlikely at this point as [the only thing on] her mind is just trying to get out of this pit of despair,” Debnam-Carey said. “She’s like, ‘I don’t need anything, ‘cause that just means there’s more to lose.’”

The back half of Fear season 4 will remove Alicia from even close long-term allies Strand (Colman Domingo) and Luciana (Danay García) as she attempts to figure things out.

“We’ve seen her in a really really dark place in the first half, and I can just say it’s only going to get worse. She’s the only remaining Clark. She’s the only person from the pilot still here,” Debnam-Carey told ET at San Diego Comic-Con.

“She, I think, has had one of the biggest transformations out of anyone. She’s gone from a teenage girl, just a regular teenage girl, to now — her entire family is gone and she’s a warrior in the apocalypse. There’s some interesting stuff for her coming up, but we really just get to see her on her own completely.”

Fear The Walking Dead returns with its mid-season premiere Sunday, August 12 on AMC.

Source: Comic Book

Press/Videos/Photos: San Diego Comic-Con Coverage

Press/Videos/Photos: San Diego Comic-Con Coverage

9 video interviews from the San Diego Comic-Con have been added to the video archive. I also added the corresponding screencaps to the gallery.


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Press/Photos/Video: San Diego Comic-Con Variety Studio

Press/Photos/Video: San Diego Comic-Con Variety Studio

Aycia and her Fear the Walking Dead castmates sat down for an interview with Variety yesterday at San Diego Comic-Con. I have included a video below, and photos/screencaps have been added to the gallery.

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Press/Videos/Photos: SDCC IMDB Boat

Press/Videos/Photos: SDCC IMDB Boat

Here are some new videos of the Fear the Walking Dead cast on the IMDB Boat at San Diego Comic-Con. The interview screencaps have been added to the gallery as well.

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Photos/Press/Video: ‘Fear the Walking Dead’ Season 4B Key Art & Comic-Con News

Photos/Press/Video: ‘Fear the Walking Dead’ Season 4B Key Art & Comic-Con News

Alycia will be a panelist on the 2018 Fear the Walking Dead panel at the San Diego Comic-Con. Ahead of the event AMC has released new key art promoting season 4B of Fear the Walking Dead. I’ve added this and more promotional photos from season 4 to the gallery.

AMC is set to unleash a horde of walkers and “The Power of Genesis” down upon San Diego later this month, with the network bringing The Walking Dead, Fear the Walking Dead, and Preacher panels to San Diego Comic-Con. Along with panel information, AMC also released new promotional art for The Walking Dead‘s upcoming ninth season and the second-half of Fear the Walking Dead‘s season 4 (which you can see above and below), as well as details on two The Walking Dead-related fan experiences.

Fear the Walking Dead (Friday, July 20: 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. – Hall H)

Panelists (M: Yvette Nicole Brown): Colman Domingo, Alycia Debnam-Carey, Lennie James, Danay Garcia, Garret Dillahunt, Maggie Grace, and Jenna Elfman; executive producers/showrunners Andrew Chambliss and Ian Goldberg; and executive producers Scott M. Gimple, Robert Kirkman, Gale Anne Hurd, Greg Nicotero, and David Alpert.

The first half of season four began with one figure huddled around a campfire, and ended with nine. Characters who started their journeys in isolation collided with each other in unexpected ways and found themselves in one of the last places they ever expected to be…together. In the back half of the season they will explore who they are now – as individuals and as part of the greater group – and how they will forge ahead. They will find themselves pitted against new adversaries – human, walker, and even nature itself. Theirs will be a journey wrought with danger, love, heartbreak, loss, and ultimately, hope.

The series is executive produced by Scott M. Gimple, showrunners Andrew Chambliss and Ian Goldberg, as well as Robert Kirkman, David Alpert, Gale Anne Hurd and Greg Nicotero, and produced by AMC Studios. The series stars Lennie James, Alycia Debnam-Carey, Colman Domingo, Danay Garcia, Garret Dillahunt, Maggie Grace and Jenna Elfman.

Fear the Walking Dead (Friday, July 20: 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. – Hall H)

Panelists (M: Yvette Nicole Brown): Colman Domingo, Alycia Debnam-Carey, Lennie James, Danay Garcia, Garret Dillahunt, Maggie Grace, and Jenna Elfman; executive producers/showrunners Andrew Chambliss and Ian Goldberg; and executive producers Scott M. Gimple, Robert Kirkman, Gale Anne Hurd, Greg Nicotero, and David Alpert.

The first half of season four began with one figure huddled around a campfire, and ended with nine. Characters who started their journeys in isolation collided with each other in unexpected ways and found themselves in one of the last places they ever expected to be…together. In the back half of the season they will explore who they are now – as individuals and as part of the greater group – and how they will forge ahead. They will find themselves pitted against new adversaries – human, walker, and even nature itself. Theirs will be a journey wrought with danger, love, heartbreak, loss, and ultimately, hope.

The series is executive produced by Scott M. Gimple, showrunners Andrew Chambliss and Ian Goldberg, as well as Robert Kirkman, David Alpert, Gale Anne Hurd and Greg Nicotero, and produced by AMC Studios. The series stars Lennie James, Alycia Debnam-Carey, Colman Domingo, Danay Garcia, Garret Dillahunt, Maggie Grace and Jenna Elfman.

Along with the panels, AMC will also have two The Walking Dead-themed themed fan experiences:

● Dead Quarters (July 19-July 21 / 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; July 22 / 11 a.m.-4 p.m. / Martin Luther King Promenade): An immersive “fan zone” experience featuring a curated walk through of settings from both series (including The Sanctuary and a thrilling 22-foot Zombie slide); photo opportunities with the walker composter and Negan’s (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) “flaming Lucille;” and other activities.

● The Walking Dead: Our World (Game activation July 19-July 21 / Convention Center Booth #4237): AMC and Next Games’ new location-based, augmented reality mobile game gives SDCC attendeees the opportunity to play the game in a unique Walking Dead-themed setting, fighting walkers alogside characters from the series. The Walking Dead: Our World will also offer players an exclusive, limited-time “Comic-Con Special Encounter” in-game activation, which will reward players with guaranteed “Rare” or “Epic” characters from The Walking Dead series to add to their collections in the game.

Source: Bleeding Cool

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Photos & Video: Additional Vogue Italia Scan, Behind the Scenes Video, & Photoshoot

I added an additional scan from the September issue of Vogue Italia to the gallery. Additionally, I added a new behind the scenes video from the shoot to the video archive as well as screencaps to the gallery. Lastly, I added a new photoshoot.

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Press: Why Is TV Killing Its Queer Women?

In March 2016, a plot twist on a little-watched TV show sparked what might be the biggest fan uprising of the social media era — a protest that could revolutionize the way LGBT characters are presented on television.

The 100 is the kind of show that’s charitably described as a “cult hit.” Since it began its run on the CW in 2014, only a couple of episodes have attracted more than 2 million viewers, but the people who tune in are a passionate bunch. As one of those enthusiastic viewers, I understand the fan fervor: The story of the struggle to survive on Earth nearly a century after a nuclear disaster supposedly made the planet uninhabitable is inventive and fast-moving, and the kickass young characters are inspiringly capable.

For many viewers, the fighting, scheming, and constantly shifting alliances are secondary to the many relationships. Love triangles, frustrated passions, a Romeo-and-Juliet love affair — apocalypse is apparently a great aphrodisiac. Clarke Griffin (Eliza Taylor), a young woman who quickly emerged as the show’s most charismatic leader, had a male lover in season 1, and she slept with a woman early in season 3, but her most significant connection began in season 2, when she developed mad chemistry with Lexa (Alycia Debnam-Carey), the openly lesbian commander of a rival faction, thus launching #Clexa, the slow-burn “ship” that may end up transforming television.

In the March 3, 2016, episode, “Thirteen,” Clarke and Lexa finally got together. The camera captured several seconds of increasingly passionate kissing, drawing away only when Lexa pulled Clarke onto her bed. Then, 64 seconds after Clarke exited the bedchamber, Lexa was struck by a stray bullet her consigliere had aimed at Clarke. Five minutes later, she was dead.

To be a lesbian watching television is to see yourself annihilated on a regular basis. And lately it has felt as if the increasing presence of LGBT TV characters serves only to provide more dead bodies. As Autostraddle’s Heather Hogan calculated in an impressively researched article, only 30 lesbian or bisexual TV characters of the 383 who have appeared on American television since 1976 have been permitted happy endings, while 95 have died.

Why does this matter? Because it’s natural for viewers to project themselves onto the people they spend time with every week. It’s downright depressing when a particular type of character — one who’s like you in a fundamental way — keeps meeting the same miserable fate. If fictional lesbians are doomed to die, you can’t blame real women for wondering if they can ever be happy. And in the case of The 100, which attracts a young audience, some isolated viewers with unsupportive families said the show was the only place they saw positive presentations of women together.

Of course, TV characters die — and on some shows, making it to the “next week on…” teaser is a major achievement. But the lesbian mortality rate is almost as high on cozy dramas as it is in postapocalyptic thrillers. As Hogan’s Autostraddle colleague Riese proved when compiling a list of more than 150 dead lesbian or bisexual TV characters from around the world, no one is safe. Queer women die in comedies (Seinfeld’s Susan Ross, poisoned by toxic envelope glue), sci-fi sagas (Battlestar Galactica’s Helena Cain, shot by an ex-lover), medical dramas (Private Practice’s Bizzy Forbes, who committed suicide after her cancer-stricken wife collapsed and died at their wedding), first-responder procedurals (Chicago Fire’s Leslie Shay, felled in the line of duty), and murder mysteries (The Killing’s Bullet, slaughtered by a serial killer).

And all too often their deaths serve to prove that lesbian and bisexual characters are less important to their creators than the heterosexuals who surround them. Take, for example, Last Tango in Halifax, a British drama that airs on PBS. In
theory, the show is about the relationship between Celia and Alan, two septuagenarians who revived their relationship after 60 years apart, but the sassy seniors were quickly overshadowed by the love affair between Celia’s daughter, Caroline (Sarah Lancashire), and Kate (Nina Sosanya), one of the teachers at the school where she is headmistress. The saga of Caroline’s coming out dominated the first two seasons, but by season 3, the couple was blissfully happy: They were married, and Kate had a baby. So, naturally, right after the wedding, Kate was killed in a car accident.

Last Tango’s creator, Sally Wainwright, was refreshingly candid about her motivations for getting rid of Kate: She did it to reconcile Caroline with her estranged mother. Wainwright told British lesbian magazine Diva, “It was more about the relationship between Celia and Caroline, and what that gave us.” In other words, the lesbian — the only person of color on the show, as it happens — was disposable.

My response to the death of The 100’s Lexa was a sad sigh of recognition. The way she died — an accidental shooting right after sex — was oddly similar to the killing of Willow’s lover Tara on Buffy the Vampire Slayer 14 years earlier. Still, I was surprised that the show had summarily divided a couple who were such a key part of its publicity campaign; sad that an erotically charged same-sex relationship had come to a sudden end; and annoyed that yet another lesbian TV character had been prematurely offed.

But #Clexa fans didn’t just sigh and mourn. They protested The 100’s queerbaiting, claiming the show had exploited the women’s relationship to attract viewers and then casually slaughtered one half of the couple. They confronted showrunner Jason Rothenberg on social media about what they saw as his manipulation of the fandom. They raised nearly $130,000 for the Trevor Project, which provides suicide-prevention services to LGBTQ youth. And they encouraged TV writers to sign the Lexa Pledge, promising, among other things, not to kill queer characters “solely to
further the plot of a straight one” and “never to bait or mislead fans.”

Shortly after “Thirteen” aired, Rothenberg justified Lexa’s death on story grounds — since the season was exploring reincarnation, she needed to die so that she could be reborn — and offered a practical explanation: Debnam-Carey is a regular on Fear the Walking Dead and wasn’t available to film The 100. But weeks later, in the wake of furious fan protests, he was forced to concede that, whatever his intentions, damage had been done: “I…write and produce television for the real world where negative and hurtful tropes exist. And I am very sorry for not recognizing this as fully as I should have.”

By the beginning of August, the Lexa Pledge had attracted only a handful of signatories, but that doesn’t mean the campaign has failed. The fan protests drove extensive press coverage — including stories in trade publications such as Variety and The Hollywood Reporter — which means writers can no longer claim ignorance about TV’s “Bury Your Gays” trope. Showrunners will always find creative rationalizations for killing queer characters. (Last summer, Neal Baer told me he had killed one half of a lesbian couple on Under the Dome “because I wanted to explore an African-American mother with a white child; I wanted to see that on TV for the first time.”) Now, though, they are on notice that they will have to justify their choices. The days of queerbaiting without consequences are over.

Source: The Advocate

Photos: Additional 2016 Magazine Scans

I just added additional 2016 magazine scans to the gallery. Enjoy!

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